Birla Temple Hyderabad

Birla Temple Hyderabad

Birla Mandir is a magnificient temple built entirely in marble, with great architectural significance. It was built by the Birla Foundation in Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India.
The temple is dedicated to Lord Venkateshwara.
The exquisite carvings of the temple, the ceiling and the mythological figurines are ample proofs of the dexterity of the sculptors and the craftsmen. There is a tower over the chief shrine of Lord Venkateswara which is called the ‘Jagadanananda Vimanam’ and is constructed in the quintessentially Orissan style. Interestingly enough, the towers over the shrines of Lord Venkateswara are reminiscent of the south Indian architectural style. The image of the presiding deity is made of granite and is 11 feet tall. A carved lotus forms an umbrella like structure over this image. In the adjacent ‘mukhamandapam’ the scenes from Indian mythology are carved in marbles. Birla Temple Hyderabad basks in a flood of light at night.
Besides the chief shrine of Lord Venkateswara, there are also separated shrines for His consorts Padmavathi and Andal within theSouth India Birla Temples Hyderabad.
The granite image of the presiding deity is about 11 ft. tall and a carved lotus forms an umbrella on the roof. The consorts of Lord Venkateswara, ‘Padmavati’ and ‘Andal’ are housed in separate shrines. There is a brass flagstaff in the temple premises which rises to a height of 42 ft.
The temple manifests a blend of South Indian, Rajasthani and Utkal temple architectures. In its entirety, it is made of 2000 tons of pure Rajasthani white marble. It is built on a 280-feet high hillock called the Naovath Pahad in a 13 acres plot. The construction of the temple took 10 years and it was consecrated in 1976.
The temple complex overlooking the southern side of Hussain Sagar, offers a magnificient panoramic view of the twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad. It presents a colorful spectacular sight when illuminated at night.
Birla Mandir (Birla Temple) refers to different Hindu temples or Mandirs built by the Birla family, in different cities. All these temples are magnificently built, some of them in white marble or in sandstone. The temples are generally located in a prominent location, carefully designed to accommodate a large number of visitors. The worship and discourses are well organized. The first one was built in 1939 in Delhi collectively by Ghanshyamdas Birla and his brothers, as well his father. Later temples have been built by, and are managed by different branches of the family.
The Birla temples in Delhi and Bhopal were intended to fill a void. Delhi, even though it was the capital of India, did not have any notable temples. During the Mughal period, temples with shikharas were prohibited until the late Mughal period. The Delhi temple, located at a prominent spot was designed to be lofty and spacious, suitable for congregational worship or discourses. Although built using modern technology, it confirmed with the Nagar style. The Delhi, Banaras and the Bhopal temple use a modern style.
The later temples are built of marble or sandstone and are constructed in the classical (Chandela or Chaulukya) style of 10-12th century. The Saraswati temple, in the BITS Pilani campus is one of the very few Sarasvati temples built in modern times (see Sharda Temple, Maihar). It is said to be a replica of the Kandariya Mahadeva Temple temple of Khajuraho; however it is built of white marble and adorned with not only images of gods, but also philosophers and scientists. The Gwalior Sun temple is a replica of the famous Sun Temple of Konark, as it would have appeared before the collapse of the main tower. Anne Hardgrove states.
A national chain of the “Birla temples,” temples of grandiose scale and design, have become major landmarks and part of the cityscapes of Indian urban life in the late twentieth century. The Birla temples exist in conjunction with other large industrial and philanthropic ventures of the wealthy Birla family, including major institutions of technology, medicine, and education. … Birla temples have redefined religion to conform to modern ideals of philanthropy and humanitarianism, combining the worship of a deity with a public institution that contributes to civil society. The architectural forms of the two newest Birla temples (Jaipur and Kolkata) incorporate innovative, dual-purpose structures into the temple design that alter temple practices to reflect the concerns of modern public culture in a religious site.

The ‘Birla Mandir’ is one of Hyderabad’s most prized temple structures ever to be built. Located in ‘Kala Pahad’, Hyderabad, this temple was established in 1976. The Birla Mandir dedicated to ‘Lord Venkateshwara’, is one of the many temples constructed by the Birla Foundation. This temple required 10 years for its construction and is now one of the most beautiful temples in Hyderabad. The presiding deity of the Birla Mandir is Lord Venkateshwara or ‘Balaji’ and is the only shrine made from granite in the city. Divine mantras are chanted at approximately 5.30 AM every morning, which evokes a peaceful feeling for all those who hear it. Listening to the melodies of great singers like ‘Tyagaraja’, ‘Annamayya’ and ‘Ramadas’ from the temple, against the picturesque view of the great orange sky will surely bring tranquillity to your mind. The Birla Mandir is always crowded with a large number of tourists and the dwellers of Hyderabad every day.
Architecture
Birla Mandir is constructed on the ‘Kala Pahad Hill’, which is at height of 280 feet. This gorgeous temple is wholly made from 2000 tons of white marbles, which were exclusively brought in from Rajasthan. The structural design of Birla Mandir was inspired from typical South Indian architecture as well as Rajasthani architecture. The four-tiered ‘Rajagopura’ that ornaments the temple top, adds to the enchanting beauty of the temple.
Above the main idol of Lord Venkateshwara, one can see the ‘Jagadananda Vimanam’, which is a tower, built in ‘Orissan’ architectural style. Other idols in the temple also have towers built over the shrines, but these are designed according to South Indian styles of architecture. One can recognize the events of the great epics, ‘Ramayana’ and ‘Mahabharatha’, carved on the marble within the interiors of the temple. The flagstaff of the temple is made from brass and is 42 feet high.
Things To Do
One can explore the temple’s intricate carvings that depict the famous epics, ‘Mahabharatha’ and ‘Ramayana’. Within the Birla Mandir Complex, there is a ‘Buddha Temple’ comprising of a number of paintings that illustrate “Buddha’s” life and his contributions.
Nearby Places
The ‘Hussain Sagar Lake’ is situated very close to the Birla Mandir. The ‘Lumbini Park’ is also located nearby, which is a beautiful park with many facilities. This park is a perfect spot to spend a wonderful time with family and friends.
Best Time To Visit
You can visit Birla Mandir from October to March when the weather is cool. The temple is open to public on all days between 7 AM to 12 PM and from 3 PM to 9 PM.
One of the most spectacular and venerated structures in Hyderabad, the Birla Mandir is indeed a must-see for all. The structure of this temple is a combination of South Indian, Rajasthani and Orissan style of architecture, which makes this shrine a splendid work of art. If you are touring Hyderabad, make sure you explore this heavenly temple and get ready to be mesmerised by its fascinating beauty